Navigation

Books in Sports

The Science of Hitting

�Baseball�s last .400 hitter share[s] his secrets in this primer still used at all levels of the game.� �Paul Dickson, author of Bill Veeck: Baseball�s Greatest MaverickNow fully revised with new illustrations and diagrams, the classic�and still the greatest�book on hitting from the last baseball player to break the magic .400 barrier, Ted Williams.Ted Williams was arguabl

Sports books

Can You Go? Assessments for the Active Athlete and Everyone Else

Training people in sport as a coach or in fitness as a personal trainer is certainly rewarding work. But there�s a problem: What do we do next? There are countless books on diet and exercise, hundreds of machines, devices and gimmicks to train people, and new gadgets and gizmos are popping up with every passing day.Can You Go? answers this question: What do we need to do

Genre: Sports

Seasons in Hell

When he arrived at the weedy, decrepit Pompano Stadium for spring training, sports writer Mike Shropshire, who had agreed to cover the team for the Fort Worth Star Telegram, did not realize that the Texas Rangers were possibly the worst baseball team in history. This book offers a riotous, candid, irreverent account of Shropshires adventures with the Rangers, from 1973 to

Category: Sports

The Science Of Hitting

As a boy, all Ted Williams wanted was to be the best hitter there ever was. Through his storied tenure with the Red Sox, he pretty much got his wish. He not only hit, he knew how to hit; there was no keener, more devoted, more articulate student of the art. The Science of Hitting is his comprehensive book of wisdom and anecdote, a baseball bible that offers clear, concise,

Sports books

The Redheaded Outfield and Other Baseball Stories

There was Delaneys red-haired trio--Red Gilbat, left fielder; Reddy Clammer, right fielder, and Reddie Ray, center fielder, composing the most remarkable outfield ever developed in minor league baseball. It was Delaneys pride, as it was also his trouble.Red Gilbat was nutty--and his batting average was .371. Any student of baseball could weigh these two facts against eac

1 2